27 October 2009

New Zealand Flag Day Rally Unites Kiwi And Australian Nationalists


Flag Day in New Zealand has once again deepened the ANZAC bonds between Australian and New Zealand nationalists.

All up, some 50 activists were present in Wellington on Saturday, October 24, to mark the sixth annual Flag Day. Flag Day was also celebrated in Christchurch, where some 20 (mainly) young New Zealand nationalists demonstrated in the city centre.

Three Australians participated in the Flag Day march and demonstration in Wellington. As in 2008, an Australian nationalist also addressed the marchers and the crowd.

Flag Day has been held since 2004 to remind Kiwis of their heritage now under full challenge by mass immigration and multiculturalism. Flag Day was initiated in 2004 at a significant moment when Chinese imperialism began raising its ugly Dragon-head over New Zealand’s economy and politics. It has now become a fixture and the day that unites many patriots who travel from across the country to attend. They show the Kiwi spirit is far from defeated and that the struggle for New Zealand freedom will only grow.

A day of successful action ….

The main event was organised by the redoubtable Wellington branch of the National Front (NF). The NF provided the organizational effort that made the day possible.

The demonstration assembled at the Cenotaph in central Wellington. Here the group honoured New Zealand’s sacred dead. From there, the participants marched to the Seddon Statue outside the National Parliament where up to 20 New Zealand Flags were held aloft. The first national flag of New Zealand from the years 1834-40 was also carried for the first time at Flag Day. This red, white and blue flag is also called the United Tribes Flag, since British officials proposed it to the Maori chiefs who warmly embraced it and to this day, some Maoris still revere it. The Australians, to mark their ANZAC links with the Kiwi patriots, flew the Australian National Flag and the Eureka Flag.

Speeches were given which noted the history of the National Flag, the first flag of New Zealand too and the need for the retention of the ANZAC link. It was noted by speakers that this year’s Flag Day was not opposed by the usual anarchist and ‘anti-racist’ rabble, who traditionally turn out to taunt marchers, or try to assault them - and abuse the police. Although they informed media they opted to boycott the Day so as “not to give publicity” to the nationalists, the truth was different. The Wellington anarcho-underground is torn apart by the realisation that their leadership (sic) has duped them to be a street gang against the nationalists, whilst they maintain links with the Labour Party and other establishment forces. The shattering of Wellington’s so-called anarchist and ‘anti-racist’ movements is a gain for all. Indeed, Vince Stephens, Wellington NF organiser quipped:

“I feel totally let down by the opposition for not supporting our Flag Day – by turning up and acting as they do.”

From the Seddon Statue, a march then took place into the busier parts of the city where a further rally was conducted. Hundreds of leaflets were handed out to minimal objection and considerable interest.

Discussions to build unity …

The marchers returned to the Wellington railway station where they took a special charter-bus, back to a meeting area.

Here various discussions were held amongst and between the National Front, the Right-Wing Resistance (which provided many of the marchers) and certain youth groups. Kiwi leaders such as Col Ansell, Kyle Chapman, Steve Larsen and Vince Stephens talked over the issues in building the New Zealand nationalist movement.

At a meeting later in the day, all present resolved that the National Front will be the political party name that activists will strive to register for electoral purposes. The goal is to have the 500 members enrolled by the next Flag Day. The privileges of a registered party can only benefit the entire New Zealand movement.

Perceptions….

What did the participants in Flag Day perceive they had achieved? One male activist said that it was a matter of demonstrating that there was “a future for our children’. A young woman said: “it is my first Flag Day; I just want to say who I am”. For another it was “about access to the people, not just a confrontation with those who oppose us, a real victory for Flag Day.”

The activists had come from Christchurch, Palmerston North, Hamilton, Auckland and Wanganui and other places; they were members of different groups, but all were New Zealanders. Their next task is to create a stronger nationalist movement in New Zealand.

Flag Day 2010…

Flag Day 2010 in Wellington promises to be a larger event. It will receive a delegation from the Australia First Party to the march and to a united meeting with speakers who will endorse the new phase of New Zealand nationalism which will be opened by the application to register National Front as a party. It may be the case too that Flag Day, held on Labour Weekend, will be advertised as a Day of Labour, a call for the ordinary Kiwi working person to achieve better than the false promises of globalisation.

As is clear, the Kiwi nationalists do not rest on their laurels. And the Australian nationalists will be there in support.

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